FK506 binding protein 8 peptidylprolyl isomerase activity manages a late stage of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) folding and stability Academic Article uri icon

publication date

  • 2012

abstract

  • Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the apical chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with 90% of patients carrying at least one deletion of the F508 (?F508) allele. This mutant form of CFTR is characterized by a folding and trafficking defect that prevents exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. We previously reported that ?F508 CFTR can be recovered in a complex with Hsp90 and its co-chaperones as an on-pathway folding intermediate, suggesting that ?508 CF disease arises due to a failure of the proteostasis network (PN), which manages protein folding and degradation in the cell. We have now examined the role of FK506-binding protein 8 (FKBP8), a component of the CFTR interactome, during the biogenesis of wild-type and ?F508 CFTR. FKBP8 is a member of the peptidylprolyl isomerase family that mediates the cis/trans interconversion of peptidyl prolyl bonds. Our results suggest that FKBP8 is a key PN factor required at a post-Hsp90 step in CFTR biogenesis. In addition, changes in its expression level or alteration of its activity by a peptidylprolyl isomerase inhibitor alter CFTR stability and transport. We propose that CF is caused by the sequential failure of the prevailing PN pathway to stabilize ?F508-CFTR for endoplasmic reticulum export, a pathway that can be therapeutically managed.
  • Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the apical chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with 90% of patients carrying at least one deletion of the F508 (ΔF508) allele. This mutant form of CFTR is characterized by a folding and trafficking defect that prevents exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. We previously reported that ΔF508 CFTR can be recovered in a complex with Hsp90 and its co-chaperones as an on-pathway folding intermediate, suggesting that Δ508 CF disease arises due to a failure of the proteostasis network (PN), which manages protein folding and degradation in the cell. We have now examined the role of FK506-binding protein 8 (FKBP8), a component of the CFTR interactome, during the biogenesis of wild-type and ΔF508 CFTR. FKBP8 is a member of the peptidylprolyl isomerase family that mediates the cis/trans interconversion of peptidyl prolyl bonds. Our results suggest that FKBP8 is a key PN factor required at a post-Hsp90 step in CFTR biogenesis. In addition, changes in its expression level or alteration of its activity by a peptidylprolyl isomerase inhibitor alter CFTR stability and transport. We propose that CF is caused by the sequential failure of the prevailing PN pathway to stabilize ΔF508-CFTR for endoplasmic reticulum export, a pathway that can be therapeutically managed.